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Whoever conceived of this "governance structure" is truly an optimist!

Experience has shown that national focal points just do not work beyond the simplest coordination functions. Imagine a hapless individual or small team trying to cope with the complexity of the demands likely to be directed at them if all the programs noted in the report actually become operational. See para 79 to see what focal points are expected to deal with.

Rubik'a Cube Quality to UN Effort at 10-Year Frame for Consumption-Production Patterns

May 2016
In a report to the High-Level Political Committee of ECOSOC (New York, 11-20 July 2016), the Secretary-General notes what has happened so far on the 10-year framework of programs on sustainable consumption and production patterns. To convey the Rubik's Cube quality of what is being attempted, I reproduce below the full text of the report (E/2016/62).


I. Background


 1.       In a world in which the human population is projected to be 9.5 billion by 2050, and in which about 1.2 billion people currently live in extreme poverty and deprivation, shifting to sustainable consumption and production patterns has become a vital condition for leaving no one behind in the transition towards sustainable development.

2.       That shift, recognized by the international community since 2002 as one of the overarching objectives of, and essential requirements for, sustainable development, is a pivotal element of the newly adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

3.       The 10-year framework of programs on sustainable consumption and production patterns, adopted at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012, serves as a global framework for action to enhance international cooperation and advance the implementation of sustainable consumption and production in all countries. Its objective is to generate collective impact through multi-stakeholder programs and partnerships, support the development and scaling up of successful sustainable consumption and production policies and initiatives at all levels, foster knowledge and experience-sharing and facilitate access to technical and financial resources for developing countries.

4.       The 10-year framework programs provide open, inclusive and collaborative platforms through which stakeholders from all sectors of society and all regions can work together in a systematic way to achieve shared objectives while contributing to the overarching goals of the framework. Inclusive and action-oriented, the programs aim to build synergies and cooperation, bringing together scattered information on and for sustainable consumption and production through existing initiatives, partnerships and networks; scale up and replicate successful policies and best practices for sustainable consumption and production; and generate and support new projects and activities on sustainable consumption and production in response to regional and national priorities and needs, as they emerge. There are currently six programs in the framework.

5.       An intergovernmental board was established, with a two-year term, to guide the implementation of the 10-year framework. Its first term came to an end on 16 September 2015 and United Nations regional groups were invited to nominate their representatives for the second term. Subsequently, the General Assembly confirmed the new composition of the board as Kenya and Nigeria (African Group), Argentina and Mexico (Latin American and Caribbean Group), Indonesia and the Republic of Korea (Asia-Pacific Group), Albania and Romania (Eastern European Group) and Germany and Turkey (Western European and Others Group).

6.       To date, 127 countries have nominated a national focal point for the 10-year framework and implementation road maps or strategies for sustainable consumption and production have been developed in several regions (Asia-Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, West Asia and Africa). More than 450 institutions, representing a range of stakeholders, including governments, United Nations bodies, civil society and private sector organizations, are engaged in the framework and its six programs.

7.       The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) serves as the secretariat of the 10-year framework.

8.       The present report has been prepared by the secretariat of the 10-year framework on behalf of the board, in response to General Assembly resolution 70/201, in which the Assembly requested the board and the secretariat to submit updated reports for the consideration of the high-level political forum on sustainable development. It follows a report submitted to the high-level forum convened under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council in 2015 (E/2015/56), which complemented a first report transmitted by the Secretary-General to the Council (E/2014/93).

  II.  Relationship to the 2030 Agenda
 
9.       The transversal (sic) role of sustainable consumption and production and the 10‑year framework as integral elements of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development have been clearly affirmed with the adoption of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals at the United Nations summit for the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda, held in New York from 25 to 27 September 2015. It is also a transversal (sic) objective of the Sustainable Development Goals, reflected in the targets of 13 of the 17 Goals, including as the focus of one stand-alone goal (Goal 12).

10.     The implementation of the 10-year framework is the first target set by the Heads of State under Sustainable Development Goal 12, a unique case in the entire 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and also an important opportunity for the framework to serve as an essential mechanism for the implementation of the Agenda.

11.     During the reporting period, several activities have been conducted under the 10-year framework to inform the design and implementation of the Agenda. They included the first global meeting of the framework, held on 14 and 15 May 2015 in New York back-to-back with the negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda, where the universal and transformative nature of sustainable consumption and production in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals and the role of the framework were strongly emphasized.

12.     Further efforts have been invested by the secretariat of the 10-year framework and its partners to inform the design of sustainable consumption and production indicators in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals. A UNEP discussion paper was released in March 2015, drawing on inputs from international experts and consultations conducted in 2014. A further report, co-authored by the Ministry of Environment in Chile and Statistics Sweden, with technical support from both the secretariat of the framework and the Statistics Division, was developed to inform the preparations for, and discussions on data and indicators at, the forty-seventh session of the Statistical Commission, held in New York from 8 to 11 March 2016, and those of the Inter-Agency Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal indicators. That report includes a proposal to support the monitoring of the targets related to sustainable consumption and production of the Sustainable Development Goals, using the System of Environmental-Economic Accounting framework, which facilitates the connection of data across the environment and the economy. In the report, the development of a capacity-building strategy to support countries in monitoring and measuring progress towards those targets is also proposed.

 III.   Progress of the 10-year framework programmes

13.     Supporting the further development and operationalization of the six sectoral and thematic programs of the 10-year framework has been a high priority in 2015-2016. That has included the launching or establishment of two further programs on sustainable buildings and construction and sustainable food systems, in addition to the four programs already launched, and the coordination and initial implementation of all the 10-year framework programs.

14.     All the 10-year framework programs now benefit from a solid governance structure established through broad consultative processes facilitated by the secretariat of the framework. That governance structure includes a leadership (up to one lead and three co-lead entities), which provides the necessary human and financial resources for the establishment of a fully dedicated coordination desk in each of the programmes. That is complemented by a multi-stakeholder advisory committee for each program, composed of up to 25 entities (governments and other stakeholder organizations). To date, 21 entities are active in the leadership role of the six programs and nearly 125 in the multi-stakeholder advisory committees, and more than 300 additional partners are formally engaged in the programs. Historical partners in sustainable consumption and production, but also new partners with global, regional or national scope, have stepped into a broadened global sustainable consumption and production community, creating new synergies and implementation capacity. Further partners willing to bring their expertise, activities and tools to the 10-year framework, and whose objectives are in line with those of the programs, can join at any time to support implementation by contacting the lead entities of the programs.

15.     The 10-year framework programs have each identified a clear set of objectives, work areas and priority implementation activities around which they can mobilize their partners. A comprehensive portfolio of activities is being developed for each of them, including: (a) implementation of the priorities and activities outlined within the work areas; (b) the existing activities of 10-year framework partners being brought into the programs to respond to specific objectives and regional and national priorities, and to strengthen the capacities of partners in sustainable consumption and production, with a view to scaling up and replicating; (c) new projects, including projects selected through calls for proposals organized under the trust fund of the framework and the development of flagship projects under individual programs and across programs. The secretariat of the framework organized the first workshop on the development of flagship projects in July 2015 in Paris, gathering more than 60 co-leads, members of multi-stakeholder advisory committees and partners in the 10-year framework programs. A consultation engaging various stakeholders is being conducted to finalize a first series of proposals for submission to donors.

16.     Efforts were directed towards the trust fund of the framework and its calls for proposals aimed at supporting implementation in developing countries and economies in transition. The activities of the trust fund are reported at the end of the section.

17.     Progress on each of the six programs is presented below, starting with the programs launched most recently.

A.    Sustainable food systems

18.     The sustainable food systems program, co-led by Switzerland (Federal Office for Agriculture), South Africa (Department of Trade and Industry), Hivos (Netherlands) and the World Wide Fund for Nature, was kicked off at a meeting co‑organized by Switzerland and South Africa on 21 and 22 October 2015 at Expo 2015, held in Milan, Italy.

19.     The program is supported by a 23-member multi-stakeholder advisory committee, composed of government agencies (Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, France, Honduras, the Netherlands and the United States of America), civil society organizations (Biovision, International Institute for Sustainable Development, International Foundation for Organic Agriculture Movements plus one vacant civil society organization cluster seat), research and technical institutions (German Development Institute, Hebrew University, Open University of Catalonia and the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Development), United Nations agencies and other international organizations (International Center for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), UNEP and the United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition) and private sector actors (Barilla S.p.A., FoodDrinkEurope, Nestlé and Smaackmakers).

20.     Activities in 2015 were mainly focused on the development of the program and its priorities. In March and April 2015, a public consultation was undertaken on the draft concept note. To ensure broad stakeholder participation, the consultation was carried out through the FAO Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition,[1] as well as through the channels and networks of the 10-year framework.

21.     The kick-off meeting and first face-to-face meeting of the multi-stakeholder advisory committee in October 2015 focused on establishing the governance of the program, adopting the program document and discussing initial priority activities under the four work areas.

22.     The program adopted four work areas: (a) raising awareness of the need to adopt sustainable consumption and production patterns in food systems; (b) building enabling environments for sustainable food systems; (c) increasing access to, and fostering the application of, actionable knowledge, information and tools to mainstream sustainable consumption and production in food systems; and (d) strengthening collaboration among stakeholders in food systems to increase the sustainable consumption and production performance of the sector. For each of those work areas, between three and five sub-areas have also been defined.

B.    Sustainable buildings and construction

23.     The sustainable buildings and construction program, led by Finland and co‑led by the World Green Building Council, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, and UNEP, was launched on 20 April 2015 during the twenty-fifth session of the Governing Council of the United Nations Human Settlements Program (UN-Habitat).

24.     The program is supported by a 19-member multi-stakeholder advisory committee composed of government agencies (Argentina, France, Malaysia, Singapore and South Africa), civil society organizations (the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (United States), TERI (India), Bioregional (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland), Development Alternatives (India), World Wide Fund for Nature, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, UNEP Sustainable Buildings and Climate Initiative (UNEP-SBCI)), research and technical institutions (Tsinghua University (China), Politecnico di Torino (Italy), Energies 2050 (France)), United Nations agencies and other international organizations (UN-Habitat, United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS)) and private sector actors (World Business Council for Sustainable Development and Skanska AB).

25.     The overall aim of the program is to achieve a situation where, by 2030, “all stakeholders involved in the planning, commissioning, design, construction, use, management and deconstruction of buildings have a common understanding of sustainable buildings and the knowledge, resources and incentives required to create, maintain and use them; structures that are healthy to live and work in, that responsibly utilize energy, water, land and other key resources, respecting environmental limits, and ultimately have a minimally adverse impact on the natural world, supporting social and economic development”.[2]

26.     The activities of the program in 2015 were focused on the development of a workplan for the period 2015-2016, developing and preparing implementation projects according to the workplan, communication of the programme to reach various stakeholders and initiating active partner engagement.

27.     At the first meeting of the multi-stakeholder advisory committee in September 2015 in Helsinki, the workplan for 2015-2016 was approved and the deliverables and milestones set.

28.     In the workplan, five work areas were identified: (a) establish, promote and enable the conditions for sustainable buildings and construction policies; (b) support and promote sustainable housing, including affordable and social housing; (c) enhance sustainability in the building supply chain; (d) reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen the climate resilience of the building and construction sector; and (e) promote knowledge-sharing, outreach and awareness-raising (cross-cutting).

29.     A range of communication material was developed in 2015, which included brochures in English and French, a flyer and banners for the first “Buildings Day”, held at the twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the program website on the global sustainable consumption and production clearing house, including a video and intranet.

30.     In 2015, the programme made efforts to develop large and medium-scale projects. The flagship projects are being developed through discussion among members of the advisory committee, while the call by the trust fund of the framework for project proposals was launched in December 2015 and will shortly result in the first three program projects.

31.     In addition to the launch, in 2015 the programme also engaged in the following outreach activities: a keynote presentation at a joint symposium of UNEP-SBCI and the Global Initiative for Resource-efficient Cities held in June in Nice, France; dissemination of information on the programme at the World Green Building Council congress, held in October in Hong Kong, at the regional meeting of the framework, held in October in Kazakhstan, and at the fifth Conference on Smart and Sustainable Built Environments, held in in December in South Africa; panel participation in the Buildings Day at the twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, held in December in Paris; and launch of the trust fund call for project proposals during the Buildings Day. C.    Sustainable lifestyles and education.


32.     The sustainable lifestyles and education program, co-led by the Ministry of Environment of Japan, with the Government of Sweden and the World Wide Fund for Nature, was launched in late 2014. Sweden and Japan have designated the Stockholm Environment Institute and the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, respectively, for the coordination of the program. It is supported by a 21-member multi-stakeholder advisory committee and it now brings together 85 partners.

33.     The overall aim of the program is to foster the uptake of sustainable lifestyles as the common norm, with the objective of ensuring their positive contribution to addressing global challenges, such as resource efficiency, biodiversity conservation, climate change mitigation and adaptation, poverty eradication and social well-being. Three work areas have been identified: (a) developing and replicating sustainable lifestyles, including low-carbon lifestyles; (b) educating for sustainable lifestyles; and (c) transforming the lifestyles of the current generation and shaping those of future generations.

34.     The first meeting of the advisory committee, held in March 2015 in Tokyo, focused on planning and selecting concrete projects that would foster sustainable lifestyles on the ground.

35.     In 2015, the program focused on developing the large- and medium-scale projects that would contribute to enabling people and communities all over the world to create and/or choose sustainable lifestyles. Four flagship projects have been developed through discussions among the members of the committee, while calls for project proposals from the trust fund of the framework were administered twice, between July and September 2015 and January and March 2016. The program coordination desk developed a resource mobilization strategy focusing on three threads: flagship projects, mid-size-projects and small projects. The projects, once launched, would substantially contribute to the objectives of the program and those of the three work areas.

36.     A draft communication strategy was developed in December 2015, entitled “Communication on rethinking how we live, how we buy and what we consume”. The objectives of the strategy are: raising awareness, empowering individuals to create sustainable lifestyles, engaging and inspiring key audiences, showcasing best practices and creating a platform for education, which aims to deliver key messages through digital channels (websites and social media), events and mass media.

37.     In addition, in 2015, the following outreach activities were undertaken: presentations on the program at the first International Forum on Sustainable Lifestyles, held in February in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, at a conference on the theme of “Shifting towards more sustainable consumption and production patterns”, held in May in Sweden, at the Whole Earth Day exhibition, held in September at Umeå University in Sweden, and at a national workshop on sustainable lifestyles, held in November 2015 in Stockholm; and participation in discussions at a conference on the theme of “Industrial policy and the good society in the context of climate change”, held in July in Mexico City, to provide input on sustainable lifestyles to the twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and in a workshop on advancing research and education on sustainable lifestyles in the 10-year framework of programs on sustainable consumption and production, held in November in Vienna.

38.     The program has benefited from the financial support of Japan, with a total contribution of $4 million to support projects conducive to sustainable and low-carbon lifestyles worldwide, in addition to an un-earmarked contribution of $1 million for the calls for proposals by the trust fund of the framework.

D.    Sustainable tourism, including ecotourism

39.     The sustainable tourism program, led by the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), and co-led by the Governments of France, Morocco and the Republic of Korea, was launched late in 2014. The program is supported by a 22-member multi-stakeholder advisory committee and now brings together a total of 103 partners.

40.     The vision of the programme is for a tourism sector that has globally adopted sustainable consumption and production practices, resulting in enhanced environmental and social outcomes and improved economic performance.

41.     The first meeting of the advisory committee, held in January 2015 in Madrid, and activities throughout the year set the foundations for a collective impact through approval of its operational terms of reference, an action plan for the coordination desk, a first set of guidance documents and the portfolio of activities.

42.     In May 2015, a participatory design of the portfolio of activities was initiated, aimed at increasing the visibility of initiatives and activities at the international level and boosting synergies and collective action among the programme actors, while advancing the implementation of the different work areas of the program. Overall, in 2015, the lead, co-leads and advisory committee linked activities worth over $2 million to the portfolio.

43.     Activities on integrating sustainable consumption and production in tourism-related policies and frameworks (work area 1) have included awareness-raising to promote the inclusion of sustainability at the top of the public agenda (Japan Ecolodge Association); increasing governance of the Regional Tourism Organization of Southern Africa by establishing the Southern Africa Sustainable Tourism Steering Committee; engagement in the development of regional sustainable tourism strategies in Chile; a review of the policies of Bhutan and Morocco, including recommendations related to sustainable consumption and production (UNEP); training of tourism officials of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations on forest-based ecotourism and sustainable consumption and production (Ecotourism Korea); creation of a Center of Excellence for ecotourism (Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, France).

44.     Collaboration among stakeholders for the improvement of the sustainable consumption and production performance of the tourism sector (work area 2) has been strengthened through piloting transborder sustainable consumption and production holiday packages across the countries of the Southern Africa Development Community and conducting research on expanding and improving sustainable consumption and production in tourism in the region (Fair Trade in Tourism South Africa); development and dissemination of materials for managers of protected areas, including references to community engagement (Tourism and Protected Areas Specialist Group of the International Union for Conservation of Nature); initial application of a tool for destinations to measure sustainability with objective data (Global Sustainable Tourism Council); a workshop conducted by the Ministry of Tourism of Morocco on mainstreaming sustainable tourism for Moroccan stakeholders; and production of a white paper outlining the key lessons learned.

45.     Activities on fostering the application of guidelines, tools and technical solutions to improve, mitigate and prevent the impact of tourism and mainstream sustainable consumption and production patterns among tourism stakeholders have included sharing knowledge on smart sustainable consumption and production solutions through the portal on sustainable tourism (Ministry of Tourism, Croatia); support to protected areas in Ecuador and Peru to develop management plans for tourist destinations, including visitor management systems and regulatory frameworks (Rainforest Alliance); support for governments, tourism businesses and local communities in the Maldives, Mauritius and Samoa to adapt to climate change (United Nations Development Program); promoting the implementation of a variety of projects encouraging sustainable consumption and production in the sector and involving local communities and government representatives (TUI Group).

46.     Activities aimed at enhancing sustainable tourism investment and financing have included starting a compilation of sources of funding for sustainable tourism (UNWTO).

47.     In 2015 three flagship project proposals were formulated through a multi-stakeholder approach and with a consortium of program actors. Three projects have also been selected for funding under the trust fund of the framework.

48.     Communication activities have been undertaken beyond the website, which have included: the launch of its Twitter (@10YFP_STP) and Facebook (10YFP Sustainable Tourism Program) social media platforms in September 2015, which currently register over 100 and over 300 followers respectively. Since July 2015, the program has had its own logo, which includes its motto “Committed to drive the change”. In December 2015, the program embarked on the design of its annual magazine, which showcases the main achievements of the year using examples, quotes and interviews with program actors. The annual magazine is expected to be ready in May 2016.

49.     In addition, in 2015, the following outreach activities were undertaken: an open meeting of the multi-stakeholder advisory committee on the theme “Towards sustainable consumption and production in the tourism sector”, held in January within the framework of the FITUR Green tourism forum in Madrid, where members of the committee shared success stories, initiatives and projects relating sustainable consumption and production to tourism, with an audience of over 200 tourism professionals. An information session on the program was organized within the framework of the fifth conference of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Tourism, held in February in Windhoek. In addition, programme actors have presented the programme at a variety of events they have attended, such as the ITB Convention, held in March in Berlin; INDABA, held in June in Durban, South Africa; a workshop on the theme of “Measuring for impact: convening thought-leaders in tourism” organized by the World Bank in June in Washington, D.C.; and the UNWTO General Assembly, held in September in Medellín, Colombia.

  E.    Consumer information for sustainable consumption and production

50.     The consumer information for sustainable consumption and production program is co-led by the Governments of Germany and Indonesia and Consumers International and was launched in July 2014. The program is supported by an 18‑member multi-stakeholder advisory committee and it now brings together 56 partners.

51.     The program serves as a global platform to support the provision of quality information on goods and services and the identification and implementation of the most effective strategies to engage consumers in sustainable consumption. It empowers and raises the profile of relevant policies, strategies, projects and partnerships, building synergies and cooperation between different stakeholders to leverage resources towards mutual goals.

52.     In 2015, progress on the program included the initiation of tangible projects and activities, including a project on advancing and measuring sustainable consumption and production for a low-carbon economy funded by the German International Climate Initiative; the selection of three projects supported by the trust fund of the framework; progress with the working groups of the program, notably Working Group 1 on the development of guidelines for reliable sustainability information for consumers. The workplan for the period 2016-2017 was adopted by the multi-stakeholder advisory committee in February 2016. The main activities undertaken in 2015 in the three defined work areas are set out below.

53.     Activities related to improving the availability, accessibility and quality of consumer information to create a basis for the provision of credible information (work area 1), have included:

           (a)      Launching the development of guidelines for reliable information on sustainability for consumers, taking into account a variety of stakeholders, which was facilitated by the establishment of a multi-stakeholder working group to develop the criteria and content of the guidelines (led by UNEP and the International Trade Center), a scoping study to identify existing material and relevant stakeholders (program coordination desk) and the contracting of a think tank to develop the first draft;

           (b)      The development of guidelines for hotspot analysis, for which an institute has been engaged to develop the methodological framework;

           (c)      Publication of a report presenting an inventory of worldwide life cycle assessment databases with recommendations for collaboration (UNEP-Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry);

           (d)      The launch of a global network of interoperable life cycle assessment databases in March 2015;

           (e)      Delivery of technical assistance for life cycle assessment database development to three developing countries;

           (f)      Capacity-building on data collection at national level delivered to three countries;

           (g)      Preparation of a draft report identifying key opportunities and areas for improvement on the assessment and communication of social impacts of products in consumer information tools, including social life cycle assessment methodologies and data.

54.     Activities on driving change in government and business to ensure that the framework conditions are provided to support best practices in relation to consumer information (work area 2) have included a scoping exercise on retailer/brand upstream practices and means of transmission and communication (program coordination desk), which informed the 2016-2017 program workplan, and the establishment of a joint working group with the sustainable public procurement program on improving collaboration between sustainable public procurement, sustainability standards and ecolabels, led by the ISEAL Alliance.

55.     Activities on enhancing communications to drive behavioral change and ensure the transition from being informed to taking action (work area 3) have included the initiation of a project on advancing and measuring sustainable consumption and production for a low-carbon economy; the establishment of a working group on Type 1 ecolabels, led by the Global Ecolabelling Network and the German Agency for International Cooperation; and a regional capacity-building workshop on green public procurement and eco-labelling in Asia, which was conducted in December 2015 in Kuala Lumpur.

56.     In 2015, the program released the following reports: “Opportunities for national life-cycle network creation and expansion around the world” and “Assessment and communication of social impacts of products in consumer information tools”.

57.     The program proposed a set of indicators to the secretariat, aligned to the relevant Sustainable Development Goals, to measure its progress and impact, which have been approved by the multi-stakeholder advisory committee.

58.     The program has endeavored to address transversal links with other programs of the framework, through the joint working group with the sustainable public procurement program. The program is also discussing a potential/future working group with the sustainable lifestyles and education program on behavioral science for sustainable consumption. It has also supported the development of two transversal flagship project proposals entitled “Better by design” and “Integrating sustainability into retail sourcing and consumer buying decisions of food products”.

59.     Communications-related activities of the program have included updating the website of the framework, publishing brochures and flyers and preparing a newsletter for partners of the programme, members of the advisory committee and wider contacts, to be issued two or three times a year. In addition, standard presentations have been developed and adapted for co-leads, members of the committee and partners to deliver, in order to promote the program at external events and regional/subregional meetings of the framework.

  F.    Sustainable public procurement

60.     The sustainable public procurement program is led by UNEP, co-led by the Korea Environmental Industry and Technology Institute and ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability, and was launched in April 2014. The program is supported by an 18-member multi-stakeholder advisory committee and it now brings together 85 partners to collectively promote the supply and demand of sustainable products through sustainable public procurement.

61.     The vision of the program is a world in which environmental, economic and social aspects are embedded in public procurement and associated supply chains, with the full support of governments worldwide. The program operates on a biennial basis and the new biennial workplan for the period 2016-2017 was approved by the advisory committee in September 2015. The workplan revolves around four work areas, which are implemented through several working groups. Those work areas are: (a) implementation of sustainable public procurement on the ground; (b) assessing implementation and the impact of sustainable public procurement; (c) identification of obstacles and promotion of innovative solutions; and (d) collaboration with the private sector.

62.     In 2015, activities under various priority work areas of the program resulted in the production of a number of technical reports and publications. The strategic documents of the program include the following: “Principles of sustainable public procurement”, adopted in March 2015; “The 10YFP SPP program’s modus operandi”, adopted in May 2015; and the vision document of the program, adopted in September 2015. The following publications have also been produced: report of working group 2B on measuring and communicating the benefits of sustainable public procurement, inclusive of the baseline analysis, the guidance framework for measuring and communicating the benefits of sustainable public procurement and pilot work released in December 2015; and a technical report of working group 3A on using product-service systems to enhance sustainable public procurement, released in May 2015. All the above-mentioned publications were disseminated through the UNEP sustainable public procurement network to around 2,500 contacts.

63.     The program has undertaken initiatives to develop a methodology and international standards for Sustainable Development Goal indicator 12.7.1 (number of countries implementing sustainable public procurement policies and action plans) in the framework of the working group overseeing the 2016 issue of “Sustainable public procurement: a global review”. The working group is composed of representatives of the co-leads of the program (ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability and the Korea Environmental Industry and Technology Institute) and consultants drafting the 2016 global review. A draft survey on the implementation of sustainable public procurement was shared with the national focal points in charge of sustainable public procurement policies in 55 countries. The survey allows an assessment to be made of the level of implementation of those policies among Member States and to assess the level of achievement of indicator 12.7.1. The working group will develop objective criteria through further analysis and consultation that will allow for the application of the indicator. Those criteria will be based on the results of the survey and further interaction with stakeholders and policymakers in countries where sustainable public procurement policies and action plans are being or will be implemented.

64.     The Seoul Declaration, “Mitigating climate change through low-carbon procurement” was drafted by the participants in an international expert meeting organized by UNEP and the Korea Environmental Industry and Technology Institute. That took place in the framework of the activities of working group 2B on measuring impacts and communicating benefits created by sustainable public procurement, in November 2015 in Seoul, with a focus on the measurement of the carbon reduction impacts of sustainable public procurement.

65.     In 2015, the program undertook the formulation of four flagship project proposals by consortiums led by ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability, the Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council, CEGESTI and Business for Social Responsibility. Three projects have also been selected for funding under the trust fund, as described above.

66.     Communication-related activities in 2015 included the release of three issues of the program newsletter; seven webinars presenting the activities of partners relating to sustainable and green public procurement, which are available on the YouTube library hosted by the global sustainable consumption and production clearinghouse; publication of the program brochure in English, French, Spanish and Russian; regular updates of the program Twitter account; implementation of a new web domain name, “10yfp-spp-progamme.org”, containing 26 regularly updated and well-maintained mailing lists, one of which encompasses the entire UNEP sustainable public procurement network of around 2,500 contacts; and regular updates of the program web page. A list of portals and web pages from all over the world dedicated to sustainable public procurement was added to the clearinghouse, which now includes details of 14 working groups with 463 members, 164 documents in the e-library, 73 initiatives on sustainable public procurement, 25 news pieces and 32 sustainable public procurement events in the calendar.

67.     In 2015, the program also engaged in the following outreach activities: a side event at the twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through sustainable public procurement; another side event on the margins of the same meeting entitled “Is public procurement an effective lever for policies against global warming?” organized by UNEP with the French Ministry of Economy; and piloting of the training modules targeted at public procurers and the private sector at the Global Cleaner Production and Sustainable Consumption Conference and the Procura+ seminar, both held in Barcelona in November 2015.

G.    The trust fund of the 10-year framework supporting the programs

68.     The trust fund call for proposals has proven to be an effective tool to bring new partners into the framework and to catalyze the development of high-quality and potentially high-impact project proposals. It has also proved to be a process that responds to a strong demand for accelerating the shift to sustainable consumption and production patterns in developing countries and in countries with economies in transition. Six calls for proposals took place between April 2015 and April 2016. In total, close to 550 complete eligible proposals were received and evaluated. Of those proposals, 93 were submitted by governments and 455 by other stakeholders. Project proposals received originated from Asia, including West Asia (230), Latin America and the Caribbean (159), Africa (132) and Eastern Europe (27). So far, 12 projects have been selected and approved for funding by the board of the framework, based on a joint evaluation by the relevant program actors against technical criteria and by the secretariat of the framework against the criteria from the adopted text of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.

69.     Funding agreements have been signed for the three projects selected under the first trust fund call for proposals and are being implemented. In South Africa, a project proposal from the Government of the Western Cape, in cooperation with the International Institute for Sustainable Development, is focused on mainstreaming sustainable public procurement through the introduction of product service systems in the Western Cape; in Uruguay, a project proposal from the Ministry of Environment and the National Procurement Agency, in cooperation with UNOPS, aims to transform the Uruguayan public procurement system as an enabler for sustainable development and to enable the implementation and enforcement of legislation on sustainability criteria in public procurement; and in the Philippines, a project proposal from the Philippine Center for Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development and the Environmental Protection and Waste Management Department of Quezon City, the largest city in Metro Manila, aims to establish and implement green public procurement at city level for the promotion of sustainable consumption and production.

70.     The nine selected proposals on consumer information for sustainable consumption and development and sustainable lifestyles and education originating from Africa, Asia and Latin America are in the final stages of development of their implementation plans and finalization of the funding agreements. Implementation of those projects is expected to start within the next two months. Furthermore, the actors of the sustainable buildings and construction and sustainable tourism programs and the secretariat of the framework have finalized the evaluation process and six recommended projects have been submitted to the board for a final decision. The proposals on sustainable lifestyles and education arising from the sixth call for proposals are currently in the final stages of evaluation. By the end of 2016, it is expected that 24 trust fund projects will have been selected for a total amount of up to $3 million. Most will be being implemented and all are expected to be reporting concrete results by the formal mid-term review of the framework. The intense activity of the trust fund was made possible by new allocations for calls for proposals from Japan ($1 million), Brazil ($800,000) and Israel ($250,000).

71.     In addition to the projects selected for funding under the trust fund, a number of high-quality proposals have been identified and have been endorsed by the secretariat of the framework. That is aimed at supporting further resource mobilization and maintaining the engagement of the partners in the framework.

 IV.   Engaging stakeholders

A.    Regional and national level engagement

72.     In June 2015, the secretariat of the framework launched the first round of the global survey on national sustainable consumption and production policies and initiatives, with the objectives of taking stock of sustainable consumption and production policies and initiatives led by governmental and public institutions worldwide; identifying opportunities for scaling up; and strengthening the capacity of the framework to respond to the needs of countries in a more targeted manner. To date, nearly 50 countries, through their national focal points, and the European Union have contributed, reporting on more than 270 national sustainable consumption and production policies and initiatives led by governments and public institutions. The results are being analysed and a full report will be issued in 2016.

73.     Research is also being conducted in parallel to identify strategic sustainable consumption and production initiatives and potential partners among all relevant stakeholders at the regional level. For instance, in Latin America and the Caribbean, a mapping of sustainable consumption and production initiatives and policies at regional and subregional levels is being developed with the support of the University of Buenos Aires and is expected to help build a database of more than 400 regional and subregional initiatives on sustainable consumption and production, including in the areas of the programs of the framework.

74.     In the Asia-Pacific region, nearly 70 per cent of the activities identified under the regional implementation road map of the framework adopted in 2014, were completed, in close coordination with SWITCH Asia, a major regional sustainable consumption and production program supported by the European Union. A regional consultation to develop a new regional sustainable consumption and production strategy in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals has started and is expected to be adopted at the next Asia-Pacific round table on sustainable consumption and production in July 2016 in Cambodia.

75.     In the Latin America and Caribbean region, a new regional sustainable consumption and production strategy and an implementation road map for the framework were adopted following the eighth meeting of the Regional Council of Government Experts on Sustainable Consumption and Production on 4 and 5 May 2015 in Panama. They highlighted key priorities and specific activities for the region in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals.

76.     The second Eastern European regional multi-stakeholder meeting, co-hosted with the Ministry of Environment, Water and Forests, took place in Romania on 9 and 10 February 2016. The meeting brought together government, civil society and business representatives from the region and government representatives from the Central Asian countries as observers. The national focal points and stakeholders from Eastern Europe shared information, increased collaboration opportunities and developed a common message on the importance of sustainable consumption and production and the framework. That has been delivered as an informal document to the eighth Environment for Europe Ministerial Conference, due to take place from 8 to 10 June 2016 in Batumi, Georgia.

77.     A number of subregions were also engaged, including Central Asia, South Asia and French-speaking African countries through capacity-building activities. The establishment of the South Asia Sustainable Consumption and Production Forum was formally confirmed at the 125th meeting of the South Asia Cooperative Environment Programme, held on 17 July 2015 in Colombo. The broad objectives of the forum are to provide leadership and develop synergies to stimulate the promotion and implementation of sustainable consumption and production policies, strategies and technologies in the region. The first subregional capacity-building workshop on sustainable consumption and production and the framework for Central Asia took place on 23 and 24 November 2015 in Kazakhstan, co-hosted by UNEP and the Ministry of Energy of Kazakhstan. An African regional capacity-building workshop for the implementation of sustainability and sustainable consumption and production tools in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was organized by the Institut de la Francophonie pour le développement durable and the secretariat of the framework in Cotonou, Benin, from 14 to 18 December 2015.

78.     National interministerial and multi-stakeholder round tables on sustainable consumption and production and the framework were organized and supported by the secretariat of the framework in the Latin America and Caribbean region in Cuba on 29 and 30 September 2015, in Ecuador in October 2015 and in Honduras in November 2015, with a view to setting up similar multi-stakeholder and interministerial coordination mechanisms in other regions in response to demand emanating from national focal points.

79.     The toolkit for national focal points has advanced significantly, including through the positive contribution of focal points themselves, and the final version will be ready to share with them in June 2016. In the meantime, an initial “toolbox” was sent to all national focal points in December 2015, including directories, implementation tools, publications and sustainable consumption and production road maps, an inventory of financial mechanisms for sustainable consumption and production, program brochures and communications documents and information on the Sustainable Development Goals and indicators related to sustainable consumption and production for the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.

80.     The toolkit will be completed by the delivery of e-learning courses on sustainable consumption and production for Africa (English and French), in close cooperation with the SWITCH Africa Green project, and for Latin America and the Caribbean (English and Spanish), developed with the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and adapted from the UNEP/UNITAR course on sustainable consumption and production initially designed for the Asia-Pacific region. The secretariat of the framework also partnered with the International Resource Panel to initiate the development and roll-out in 2016 of a massive open online course on sustainable food systems targeted at policymakers, including the national focal points, in the Asia-Pacific region.

81.     The renomination process for the second term of the stakeholder focal points for the framework is continuing. The process has been the subject of consultation between the secretariat of the framework, the UNEP Major Groups and Stakeholders Branch, the Department of Social Affairs and the incumbent stakeholder focal points. It includes the formation of a selection committee, as elected by the civil society organizations representing the major groups and other stakeholders. Representatives of those groups can then present themselves as potential stakeholder focal points and the final selection will be made by the selection committee before June 2016.

  B.    Communication and outreach

82.     The institutional website of the framework, hosted on the UNEP corporate website, has been regularly maintained to disseminate information about the framework, including regional activities, the programs and the trust fund (www.unep.org/10yfp). The website functions as the primary institutional communication tool, providing an up-to-date view of the framework from an institutional point of view and allowing governmental and non-governmental stakeholders a clear snapshot of the current and future activities of the programs and the framework as a whole. The site also hosts a quarterly newsletter, which is disseminated to thousands of stakeholders, providing timely notifications of regional, program and secretariat activities.

83.     Social media has proved to be a powerful tool for engaging new stakeholders and providing information about the latest activities under the framework and its programs. The social media accounts of the global sustainable consumption and production clearinghouse and the framework have increased rapidly in visibility (950 likes on Facebook and 2,900 followers combined on Twitter). Social media has allowed for real-time information on important events to be disseminated globally, reaching thousands of stakeholders through short, targeted messaging. Social media has also allowed for the establishment of closer relationships with many organizations both inside and outside the United Nations system, through cross-promotion of activities in which the framework has a shared interest.

84.     Communications activities are also undertaken within each of the programs as described in the relevant sections above.

  C.    Knowledge management

85.     The community of the global sustainable consumption and production clearinghouse, functioning as the knowledge management platform of the framework, is where stakeholders come to find concrete opportunities to engage with the framework. The clearinghouse complements the institutional website of the framework, acting as a global one-stop hub for sustainable consumption and production, where large amounts of information can be brought together, managed and disseminated by region and theme. Members have access to thousands of pieces of easily searchable data, through which they can find collaboration opportunities based on their expertise and areas of interest. More than 2,900 members of the clearinghouse from over 150 countries, representing more than 2,000 governmental and non-governmental institutions can highlight the work of their organizations and search events, publications and collaboration opportunities to scale up their efforts across the diverse thematic and sectoral disciplines of sustainable consumption and production. The database of initiatives has continued to expand, with members from all regions submitting more than 750 entries. An e-library with 500 publications, toolkits, technical reports, manuals, etc., provides a wealth of research on sustainable consumption and production organized by region and theme. The programs of the framework are also present in the clearinghouse, providing information on activities and work areas and opportunities to take part in the programs by signing up to the increasing network of partner organizations.

86.     The upgrade of the clearinghouse started in 2015, to enhance its utility for the framework and the global sustainable consumption and production community. A suite of new functionalities will allow for a more user-friendly experience and the ability to present information focusing on best practices from around the globe to help spur concrete, scalable action on the ground. The framework will have a central role in the upgraded platform, with each program having a dedicated coordination hub from which to organize and direct activities. A complete portfolio of activities for each program will be easily searchable. The national focal points will highlight sustainable consumption and production work in their respective countries through dedicated country profiles, customizable pages managed by the focal points to provide a window into sustainable consumption and production actions at the national level. The renovated platform will also provide critical tools for the secretariat of the framework to report on progress at the global level and will provide visibility and an interactive platform for members to keep up to date on the activities of other stakeholders and the programs.

  V.   Ensuring that no one is left behind


87.     Sustainable consumption and production has a key role in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and “ensuring that no one is left behind”.

88.     All of the thematic programs contribute through their activities to ensuring that no one is left behind. For example, the program on consumer information for sustainable consumption and production sets out to ensure that everyone is able to access reliable, understandable information on the sustainability of goods and services and their usage and disposal. The program on sustainable lifestyles and education is developing a portfolio of projects that contribute to an environment where people and communities all over the world can create and/or choose sustainable lifestyles. The sustainable tourism program places the creation of sustainable livelihoods through tourism at the heart of its activities. The sustainable buildings and construction work areas include social housing, reducing the impact of climate change, strengthening resilience and knowledge-sharing, which aim to integrate the most vulnerable segments of society. Sustainable food systems are critical to improving food security and nutrition and for poverty alleviation. They play an important role in increasing resource efficiency, more sustainable use of resources and building resilience in communities by safeguarding the soil, biodiversity and ecosystems which underpin food production. The sustainable food systems program will bring together existing initiatives and partnerships working in related areas, highlighting good practices and success stories and building synergies and cooperation among stakeholders along food supply chains from producers to final consumers.

  VI.   Lessons learned and recommendations


89.     A key challenge of the programs is the multitude and variety of stakeholders within each of them and the different economic, social, political and cultural realities in different regions and countries. Those can potentially turn into opportunities through adequate engagement and the tailoring of solutions to both stakeholder needs and national or regional specificities.

90.     Another key challenge of the framework is to ensure that implementation of the programs, as well as the implementation activities of global, regional and national actors, are not confined in silos. Strong communications and facilitation of information flows need to be in place.

91.     The resources needed for implementation of the framework are a challenge at all levels. Resource mobilization for the activities of the programs, the secretariat and the trust fund (unearmarked) is essential for the framework to remain a demand-driven implementation mechanism.

92.     Monitoring and reporting on progress and on impacts will be a challenge for the framework, given the multiple levels of delivery of the platform. A monitoring and evaluation framework, including progress and impact indicators, is being developed, with the objective of providing guidance for reporting at different levels of implementation.

93.     The visibility challenge is also of great importance for the framework, at various levels. The prominence of sustainable consumption and production in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has given the framework important exposure at the global level and in an increasingly political context. The challenge is translating that into high visibility among a very broad group of stakeholders for strengthened implementation. There are many actors in the framework, with different roles and responsibilities, who can all contribute to increasing the visibility of the implementation of the framework.

94.     At the first international meeting of the framework in May 2015, partners and stakeholders highlighted the following needs in their final recommendations: (a) facilitation of more exchange between the programs, regions and countries of the framework and in the context of regional strategies, encouraging South-South, South-North and North-North cooperation; (b) provision of capacity-building at national and local level, while strengthening the role of national focal points; (c) ensuring more active involvement of stakeholder focal points and access to key information.

95.     In that context, to accelerate the implementation of the framework, a number of actions are required:

           (a)      Coordination of the global platform of the framework through the core functions and services of the secretariat;

           (b)      Consolidation and implementation of the portfolios of the programs of the framework to reflect the real value of the framework and all the resources it is catalyzing;

           (c)      Strengthening of communications channels and cooperation between the programs, regional platforms and national focal points;

           (d)      Encouragement of further contributions to the trust fund to enable timely implementation of the programs at global and national levels and at the scale being demanded by many actors;

           (e)      Securing more active participation of the private sector and financial institutions in the framework by demonstrating the economic case for, and return on, investment generated by the shift to sustainable consumption and production patterns;

           (f)      Monitoring and measuring progress on sustainable consumption and production, including that delivered by the framework.

96.     The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals is a major opportunity to demonstrate the added value of the framework, enhance cooperation and provide support for the shift towards sustainable consumption and production patterns worldwide. In 2016 and beyond, the focus will be on implementation and scaling up the collective impact of the partners in the framework and on monitoring and measuring progress on the shift to sustainable consumption and production.

        [1]            See www.fao.org/fsnforum/forum/discussions/sustainable-food-systems.

          [2]            See the program document of the sustainable buildings and construction program, available from www.unep.org/10yfp/Portals/50150/10YFP%20SPP/Programmes%20template/
SBC%20template.pdf.

The authors of the report use electronic media but their mindsets seem to be rooted in much older habits of mind. 

Brochures? Fliers? Town criers next?

That's one sentence!

A glimmer of hope!.

This is as incomprehensible a report as I have come across in four decades.

Para 5 is what made me think of Rubik's Cube.   

Another one sentence paragraph -- but it has semicolons

If ever there was meat for a JIU inspector, this is surely it!

Para 4 sounds great but is impractical because there is no mechanism to ensure collaborative work.  

In geometry a transversal is a line that crosses two others. What it means to the authors of this report is a mystery

As important as the conceptual aspect of this (perhaps more important), is the question of how the data will be collected, analyzed and used. A framework for global geospatial organization of data will be necessary and a determined push to get makers of smart phones to move towards incorporating data collection and analysis functionalities

undiplomatic times united nations news

Switzerland is doing some innovative work in India. Some exciting stuff might happen